The Anglo-Ethiopian Society

Panel discussion - Seeing like Scott in Ethiopia

hosted by Jacob Wiebel and Jason Mosley

Tuesday 14th June 2016

5:00pm - 7:00pm in the Seminar Room, at the African Studies Centre, 13 Bevington Road, OX2 6LH
Free, all welcome - discussions will probably continue in the pub after the lecture.


An informal roundtable on approaches to applying the work of James C. Scott to research on Ethiopia.

James C. Scott is a political scientist and anthropologist. He is comparative scholar of agrarian and non-state societies, subaltern politics, and anarchism. His primary research has centered on peasants of Southeast Asia and their strategies of resistance to various forms of domination. Scott is Sterling Professor of Political Science at Yale University, where he has directed the Program in Agrarian Studies since 1991.

More information can be found on the African Studies Centre website.

The Horn of Africa Seminar brings together students and scholars interested in examining the region from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. This term, the seminar will look at the impact of war on Somali men, and the broader implications of those impacts, fascist Italian brutality in Ethiopia, the experiences of Somali Bantu and their host community in a US town, as well as the political marketplace in the Horn of Africa. By hosting lectures by experienced researchers alongside post-graduates, and by mixing academic and policy research, we hope to come to a shared, factually informed and politically relevant understanding of trends in the region.


Download the full programme for the Horn of Africa Seminar:

Horn of Africa Seminar - TT 2016 - Termcard pdf file Horn of Africa Seminar - TT 2016 - Termcard.pdf



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